I’m having a hard time remembering what your laugh sounded like, how the room felt warmed by your happy roar, how it felt to hug you. How it felt to be the person I was around you. I miss you.


I’ll eat you up I love you so.

blackhistoryeveryday:

blackfeminism:

smithsonianfolklife:

The dap, the fist bump, the black power handshake. It goes by many names and carries many meanings. Photographer LaMont Hamilton is devoting his research fellowship with us to unearthing stories about the dap for his project Five on the Black Hand Side.
Read about the dap’s history and evolution on Talk Story: http://bit.ly/1odnKKM.

they called the “terrorist fist jab” on fox

The dap originated during the late 1960s among black G.I.s stationed in the Pacific during the Vietnam War. At a time when the Black Power movement was burgeoning, racial unrest was prominent in American cities, and draft reforms sent tens of thousands of young African Americans into combat, the dap became an important symbol of unity and survival in a racially turbulent atmosphere. Scholars on the Vietnam War and black Vietnam vets alike note that the dap derived from a pact black soldiers took in order to convey their commitment to looking after one another. Several unfortunate cases of black soldiers reportedly being shot by white soldiers during combat served as the impetus behind this physical act of solidarity.
Such events, combined with the racism and segregation faced by black G.I.s, created a pressing need for an act and symbol of unity. The dap, an acronym for “dignity and pride” whose movements translate to “I’m not above you, you’re not above me, we’re side by side, we’re together,” provided just this symbol of solidarity and served as a substitute for the Black Power salute prohibited by the military.
White soldiers and commanding officers deemed the handshake a threat under the misconception that the dap was a coded language of potential black insurrection. In fact the dap was also a coded form of communication between soldiers that conveyed necessary information for survival, such as what to expect at the battlefront or what had transpired during an operation. The dap was banned at all levels of the military, and thus many black soldiers were court-martialed, jailed, and even dishonorably discharged as a punishment for dapping. Military repression of the dap further cemented a desire for a symbol of solidarity and protection among black men.

blackhistoryeveryday:

blackfeminism:

smithsonianfolklife:

The dap, the fist bump, the black power handshake. It goes by many names and carries many meanings. Photographer LaMont Hamilton is devoting his research fellowship with us to unearthing stories about the dap for his project Five on the Black Hand Side.

Read about the dap’s history and evolution on Talk Story: http://bit.ly/1odnKKM.

they called the “terrorist fist jab” on fox

The dap originated during the late 1960s among black G.I.s stationed in the Pacific during the Vietnam War. At a time when the Black Power movement was burgeoning, racial unrest was prominent in American cities, and draft reforms sent tens of thousands of young African Americans into combat, the dap became an important symbol of unity and survival in a racially turbulent atmosphere. Scholars on the Vietnam War and black Vietnam vets alike note that the dap derived from a pact black soldiers took in order to convey their commitment to looking after one another. Several unfortunate cases of black soldiers reportedly being shot by white soldiers during combat served as the impetus behind this physical act of solidarity.

Such events, combined with the racism and segregation faced by black G.I.s, created a pressing need for an act and symbol of unity. The dap, an acronym for “dignity and pride” whose movements translate to “I’m not above you, you’re not above me, we’re side by side, we’re together,” provided just this symbol of solidarity and served as a substitute for the Black Power salute prohibited by the military.

White soldiers and commanding officers deemed the handshake a threat under the misconception that the dap was a coded language of potential black insurrection. In fact the dap was also a coded form of communication between soldiers that conveyed necessary information for survival, such as what to expect at the battlefront or what had transpired during an operation. The dap was banned at all levels of the military, and thus many black soldiers were court-martialed, jailed, and even dishonorably discharged as a punishment for dapping. Military repression of the dap further cemented a desire for a symbol of solidarity and protection among black men.

dapperalbinobudgie:

instagrarn:

goodnight moon. goodnight Milky Way. goodnight Ursa Major (UMa I dSph). goodnight 24IC 1613 (UGC 662.350[8].

goodnight nerd

Damon Albarn Looks To 2016 For New Gorillaz Album Gorillaz fans everywhere are happy and feelin’ glad. Damon Albarn, frontman for the animated-electronic outfit, has announced that a new Gorillaz album
is in the works and slated for a 2016 release.
After reuniting Blur in 2009 (and again in 2012), Albarn revealed in an interview with The Sydney Morning Herald that he is currently in the process of “reactivating Gorillaz for a 2016 release.” The record would serve as the fifth full-length LP from the UK collective, and the first album from Gorillaz since 2011′s iPad-crafted The Fall.
Albarn has kept himself busy with a slew of side projects and collaborations since parting with Blur in 2003. his most recent being a 2014 solo record entitled Everyday Robots. After releasing a second album with Gorillaz in 2005, Albarn teamed up with UK rock icons Paul Simonon (The Clash), Simon Tong (The Verve), and drummer Tony Allen to create the supergroup The Good, the Bad, & the Queen. Albarn revealed that a new album for that project is already written and just needs to be recorded. When asked about how he manages to keep so many projects going, Albarn cited his enthusiasm to create as the culprit behind his neverending need to work.
I was just excited to create and still am. I love working with people, essentially. I do drive stuff, but I love the atmosphere and process of collaboration. It’s my favourite thing.
Check out a video below of Albarn and Gorillaz performing Empire Ants with Little Dragon frontwoman Yukimi Nagano, and be on the lookout for new material from Gorillaz in the not-too-distant future.

Damon Albarn Looks To 2016 For New Gorillaz Album

Gorillaz fans everywhere are happy and feelin’ glad. Damon Albarn, frontman for the animated-electronic outfit, has announced that a new Gorillaz album
is in the works and slated for a 2016 release.

After reuniting Blur in 2009 (and again in 2012), Albarn revealed in an interview with The Sydney Morning Herald that he is currently in the process of “reactivating Gorillaz for a 2016 release.” The record would serve as the fifth full-length LP from the UK collective, and the first album from Gorillaz since 2011′s iPad-crafted The Fall.

Albarn has kept himself busy with a slew of side projects and collaborations since parting with Blur in 2003. his most recent being a 2014 solo record entitled Everyday Robots. After releasing a second album with Gorillaz in 2005, Albarn teamed up with UK rock icons Paul Simonon (The Clash), Simon Tong (The Verve), and drummer Tony Allen to create the supergroup The Good, the Bad, & the Queen. Albarn revealed that a new album for that project is already written and just needs to be recorded. When asked about how he manages to keep so many projects going, Albarn cited his enthusiasm to create as the culprit behind his neverending need to work.

I was just excited to create and still am. I love working with people, essentially. I do drive stuff, but I love the atmosphere and process of collaboration. It’s my favourite thing.

Check out a video below of Albarn and Gorillaz performing Empire Ants with Little Dragon frontwoman Yukimi Nagano, and be on the lookout for new material from Gorillaz in the not-too-distant future.

(Source: lessthan3)

onlyoldphotography:

Teenie Harris: Lena Horne reflected in mirror in dressing room at Stanley Theatre, c. 1944

onlyoldphotography:

Teenie Harris: Lena Horne reflected in mirror in dressing room at Stanley Theatre, c. 1944

stunningpicture:

This ring snake’s colors are amazing

stunningpicture:

This ring snake’s colors are amazing

defacing-grace:

thecutestofthecute:

Congratulations!! You got mail !!!.. Pup-mail that is!!!

I would die